Love Those Fruits and Veggies – When They’re Safe to Eat

Organic fruits and vegetables don't have pesticides, but they still need washing. Photo: © Tomo Jesenicnik - Fotolia.com

Hungry? How about a juicy peach? Imported grapes are sooo delicious. Apples are yummy. And cherries are a snack straight from Paradise.

Or not.

Watch Out for the Dirty Dozen

Fact is, every one of those conventionally raised, scrumptious food choices is laden with pesticides — dozens of different pesticide chemicals. According to an article on About.com, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) compiled information about pesticides “from approximately 96,000 studies by the USDA and FDA of the 49 fruits and vegetables listed between 2000 and 2008.” EWG then created a handy Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides, which lists the “Dirty Dozen” and the “Clean Fifteen.”

When I first read EWG‘s list last year, I was more than a little chagrined to see many of my favorite foods listed in the Dirty Dozen. I truly love 11 of the 12 foods: “peaches, strawberries, apples, blueberries, nectarines, bell peppers, spinach, kale, cherries, potatoes, grapes.” (I’m not so crazy about celery.) These are many of the foods I most enjoy. And being almost-entirely a vegetarian, they’re foods I depend on for their nutrient value — especially kale.

If, like me, you love eating foods from the Dirty Dozen list, there’s a solution: Eat organic. Foods raised using organic methods don’t have pesticide residues to worry about. Yes, there’s the occasional bug. (I’m very selective when choosing kale at the grocery store or farmer’s market. Bugs are hard to see without pulling back each leaf and taking a good, long look.) But I’d rather work around a bug or two that I can see than try to fight against invisible pesticide residues. Wouldn’t you?

You can download the EWG Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides, print it, and take it shopping with you. Or, you can insist on organic produce. It’s an easy choice for our family most of the time, though our selection can be somewhat limited at the grocery store. Farmers’ markets and CSAs are more likely to provide more organic options.

If avoiding pesticides in your foods is important to you, too, then ask for organic selections. Consumers won’t get more options if we don’t create a demand for them. Farmers have to make a living, too, and there’s more work and more spoilage when raising organic produce. Our willingness to pay a little more and to purchase organic foods helps support farmers in their efforts to bring us more healthy choices.

Wash Your Fruits and Veggies

When I started writing this post, I had intended to focus on Earth Friendly Products’ Fruit & Vegetable Wash as way to clean produce of “soil, dirt, and wax” (their words). That’s all good. And it’s important to clean produce before you eat it. But then I started wondering if this product could wash away the biggest problem of all: pesticides.

According to the Earth Friendly Products website, their Fruit & Vegetable Spray is “especially ideal for cleaning off oily pesticides, waxes and chemicals that are designed to be water resistant.” Wow. I didn’t expect that.

And, as for cleaning produce — organic or conventionally grown — it seems to do the job as well as similar products I’ve tried. But what I like best about Earth Friendly Products’ Fruit & Vegetable Wash is that it’s made from all natural ingredients — no artificial chemicals that I can’t pronounce, let alone comprehend.

What’s in it? “Purified water, 100% natural amphoteric coconut based surfactant, citric acid.” No sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), which some other products contain. (SLS is a skin irritant for many people.)

Using it is simple. Spray it on every exterior surface of the fruit or vegetable. Then wash it off with warm water. Frankly, I expected the directions to include scrubbing or waiting for the spray to take effect. In fact, when I washed grapes just before writing this post, I waited a couple of minutes before washing it off. When I’ve used the Earth Friendly Products spray to clean apples and oranges, I’ve rubbed it on the skin of the fruit, rather than just giving it a quick spritz. (I’m apparently a creature of habit.)

Once the Earth Friendly Products’ Fruit & Vegetable Wash has been washed off, there’s no aftertaste or residue left behind. Does it completely clean the fruits or vegetables? I don’t honestly know, but they look and feel clean. Does it do better than using distilled water, which is preferred by the Extension Office at the University of Maine over other fruit and vegetable sprays? I don’t know that, either;  I haven’t done any scientific tests. But distilled water doesn’t contain any surfactants, and this product does. The plant-derived surfactant in Earth Friendly Products’ Fruit & Vegetable Wash should loosen anything attached to the skin of the produce.

You might be interested in the features of the product, according to the Earth Friendly Products website:

  • pH 3.0-3.5, but gentle on hands and skin
  • Non-polluting/100% biodegradable/non-toxic/natural.
  • Made of replenishable/sustainable ingredients
  • Plant-based surfactants we use do not harm the item being cleaned, your body or the environment
  • Helps remove pesticides, chemicals, heavy metals, dirt, wax and bacteria.
  • 100% tasteless
  • Odorless
  • Rinses away completely; leaves no residue or aftertaste
  • No lengthy cleaning process required: sprays on and rinses off; works quickly and easily; no need to scrub or soak; no waiting period
  • Free of alcohol, bleach, DEA or hydrogen peroxide.
  • Easy to recycle: #1 PETE HDPE plastic container

Did you notice the words, “Helps remove pesticides, chemicals, heavy metals, dirt, wax and bacteria”? They give me confidence that Earth Friendly Products’ Fruit & Vegetable Wash is much more powerful than distilled water.

And then they list the benefits:

  • Doesn’t irritate skin.
  • Fruit and vegetables grown inorganically can be cleansed of surface pesticides, chemicals and waxes without depositing other harmful chemicals or adversely effecting taste.
  • It really works
  • Safe for you and the environment
  • Non-toxic/non-polluting


One thing I do know is that Earth Friendly Products has a long-standing reputation as an environmental company making eco-friendly products that live up to their advertising. With each Earth Friendly Products item I’ve tried so far, I’ve been pleased with the results and confident in their safety. But check out the company for yourself. I think you’ll like what you learn.

You can purchase Earth Friendly Products Fruit & Vegetable Wash from the company’s website (though I’m having trouble getting it to work on my Mac as I write this). You can also find local retailers by entering your zip code into their store finder. Or, you can purchase the product through Amazon, though Amazon doesn’t seem to offer individual bottles. Current offerings on Amazon range from $18.00 for a 6-pack of 17-oz. bottles to $32 for a 6-pack of 32-oz. bottles to $49.57 for a 12-pack of 22-oz. bottles. As always, please try your local stores first.

The Small Print

Blue Planet Green Living received a free sample of  the product described in this post. No other compensation or incentive was provided.

Blue Planet Green Living’s policy is to only review those products we feel merit overall positive comments. If we do not like a product, we do not review it. We are not influenced by complimentary products and provide our honest opinions. For more information, please visit the Policies tab on the top navigation bar.

Blue Planet Green Living has an affiliate relationship with Amazon.com. If you purchase this product or any other products through Amazon by clicking on our affiliate link, Blue Planet Green Living will receive a small financial compensation from Amazon, which we gratefully use to sustain this website.

Julia Wasson

Blue Planet Green Living (Home Page)

Take Action to Support Healthy Foods

School

"Kevin's Law" provides "science-based food safety criteria ... to prevent contaminated meat and poultry from entering our food supply...." Photo: © Michael Chamberlin - Fotolia.com

Although we’ve written briefly about the movie Food, Inc., the following letter, written to friends in Iowa by Lynn Fallon, is well worth adding to the conversation. At the end, Lynn urges us to write to our elected officials to help support sustainable agriculture. She lists those who serve Iowa, but the issues involved touch all of us. If you live in the U.S., you can find the contact information for your governor and state legislators, US Senator and Representative, and the president and vice president here. We appreciate Lynn’s willingness to allow us to publish this excerpt from her letter. — Julia Wasson, Publisher


Dear Friends,

Over the weekend we saw the movie, Food, Inc. with friends. We were told to have dinner first because the movie would take away our appetite. We didn’t doubt that possibility. But, for one very simple reason, we don’t have the same kind, or the same level, of concern: We know where nearly all our food comes from, and we know the producers and growers who provide it.

Still, the movie is unsettling. None of us were vegetarians before seeing the movie, nor did we leave ready to become vegetarians.  But the level of cruel and inhumane treatment of animals in the film was difficult to watch. And, witnessing the levels of bacteria, chemicals, and waste products involved in America’s industrialized food system was very disconcerting, to say the least.

Even more startling and heart-wrenching was the segment of the film that featured the death of a toddler. In 2005, Congresswoman Anna Eshoo brought H.R. 3160, the Meat and Poultry Pathogen Reduction and Enforcement Act (“Kevin’s Law”) to the floor of the House with this introduction: “Kevin’s Law is named in memory of 2 1/2-year-old Kevin Kowalcyk, who died so tragically in 2001 after eating a hamburger contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. Kevin’s untimely death was agonizing and brutal. No person should experience the pain that Kevin did, and no family should have to bear witness to a loved one suffering in the way he did…. Passage of Kevin’s Law would put into place major recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Advisory Committee for Microbiological Criteria for Foods, both of which have consistently supported greater federal enforcement of food-safety standards.”

At the other end of the spectrum was Joel Salatin, owner of Polyface Farms in Virginia. His animals are raised humanely and processed on site with exponentially lower bacteria counts than the nearby industrial meat-packing plant. Animals live outside and have adequate space, clean water, shelter from the elements when necessary and exposure to sunshine. Many customers drive several hundred miles to buy their meat from Salatin, because they have a relationship with him and know how his animals are raised and processed.

In Iowa, there are more and more farmers like Salatin — and it’s important for us to support them, for their sake and for ours.

Did you know that if Iowans ate five servings of fruits and vegetables per day, and Iowa farmers supplied that produce for just three months of the year, production and marketing for these additional crops would add $302.4 million and 4,094 jobs to the Iowa economy (Swenson, D. The Economic Impacts of Increased Fruit and Vegetable Production and Consumption in Iowa: Phase II. Ames, IA: Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture; May 2006.) And that’s just fruits and vegetables! Think of the possibilities for family-farm raised meat, dairy, cheese and a huge range of value-added products.

I recently attended a Communities of Practice conference put on by the Leopold Center. This conference brought together many types of people interested in local agriculture — farmers, nutritionists, educators, social service agency directors, economists, grassroots organizers, and food-industry business owners. They came together to share what they know, to learn from one another regarding different aspects of their work and to provide a social context for that work. These leaders are working to make it easier to connect producers with consumers/eaters.

But — there’s plenty you can do, too!

Actions You Can Take

Buy Locally

Find a farmer or CSA (community supported agriculture) near you.


Educate Yourself

Here are several websites that will present you with an array of topics:

Crossroads Resource Center

Drake University Law School

Environmental Nutrition Solution


Support Nutritious School Lunches

The summer recess is coming up, and during their town hall meetings, we need to contact specific elected officials who serve on committees that deal with the Child Nutrition Act re-authorization. This is the legislation that contains funding for the Farm to School program. We need to let them know we want good food in our schools. Please email, call or write your Senator and Representative in support of the Farm to School program. And, if possible, attend a town hall meeting with your elected official. Their contact information is included here:

Senator Tom Harkin
Email Address

Office Locations
Phone: (202) 224-3254

Senator Charles Grassley (information for phone, email, and office locations)

Congressman Dave Loebsack
Phone: (202) 225-6576
Email Address
Office Locations

Congressman Tom Latham (information for phone, email, and office locations)

Thanks for reading!

Lynn Fallon


Blue Planet Green Living (Home Page)


Rare or Well Done?

June 3, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog, Cooking, Food Safety, Front Page, Health

Eating charred meat is a potential cause of cancer. Photo: © Sima - Fotolia.com

You light the grill. You prep the meat. You cook it: Blackened and charred, well done, pink in the center, or still mooing when it hits the plate… the range of preferences is vast. But which is better for you? Or does it even matter? In the last few days, I’ve read several sources that have me wondering whether there is any safe way to cook meat.

An article in the Daily Mail, a publication from the UK, warned to not eat meat that is over-cooked. Columnist David Derbyshire reported, “In a nine year study of more than 62,000 subjects, those who liked their steak well done were found to be almost 60 percent more likely to develop cancers of the pancreas, colon, stomach and prostate.” Derbyshire was referencing a study by Dr. Kristin Anderson of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, who was investigating the connection between charred meat and pancreatic cancer. 60%? Suddenly that charred appearance of a steak on the grill doesn’t look so appetizing.

Danger in the Flames

Flames and smoke from the grill transfer harmful substances to the meat. Photo: © Artyshot-Fotolia.com

Following news of Anderson’s study, Dr. Mercola (mercola.com) warned that anytime meat is cooked too fast or at too high a temperature, three harmful chemicals are created in or on the meat. This is true whether the meat is grilled or fried.

  • Heterocyclic Amines (HCAs): These form when food is grilled at high temperatures, searing the meat, creating blackened or burned areas of the muscle fibers. Those blackened grill lines, the parts that actually sit on the steel grid of your grill, or any sections of the meat that should become burned to a black color, are the most dangerous; those are the areas you should avoid, because they are linked to cancer. How bad is the cancer risk from HCAs? Eating a lot of flame-grilled meats (especially chicken) can raise your risk of pancreatic cancer from the average of 1 person in 10,000 to a shocking 1 in 50.
  • Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): When cooking on the grill, you’re bound to see flare-ups caused by fat that drips onto hot coals. The flames rise up and engulf the meat, searing the flesh. Often, this results in blackened sections where the heat is highest. Sometimes you’ll also see small billows of smoke surrounding the meat. In either case, cancer-causing PAHs are being transferred to the food you are about to ingest.
  • Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs): High temperatures increase the formation of AGEs in food. This happens even when the food is being sterilized or pasteurized, not just when it’s being grilled. Eating food cooked at high heat transfers AGEs to your body. The result can be higher incidences of kidney disease, heart disease, and diabetes.

Digestion Difficulties

There’s another problem with overcooking meat, and this is especially important if you have any digestive difficulties to begin with, according to Nancy Appleton, Ph.D. When food is cooked at too high a heat or cooked too long, your body has more trouble digesting it. This causes the food to stay in your digestive system longer, as your body works to break it down.

Your body is designed to make use of food at the cellular level, but because overcooked food doesn’t break down very well, it’s not readily available. If your body can’t make use of the food you put into it, you won’t function at an optimal level and can become ill.

The upshot is, don’t eat any meat that is burned, charred, or seared. That’s pretty hard to do when you’re cooking on a grill. Grilling is grilling because of the charring and searing. The article concluded that it’s best to eat meat that is raw or only lightly cooked. (Hey, I can do that with a Bic lighter.)

Cook Pork Thoroughly

But wait! The very next article that I read (on Wikipedia) contradicted that wisdom with the title: “Trichinosis and e-coli, the hazards of eating meat that is too raw.”

Trichinosis is caused by Trichinella species (also termed parasitic nematodes, intestinal worms, and roundworms) that initially enter the body when meat containing the Trichinella cysts (roundworm larvae) is eaten. For humans, undercooked or raw pork and pork products, such as pork sausage, has been the meat most commonly responsible for transmitting the Trichinella parasites.

These cysts, or eggs, are nasty little buggers. The enclosure breaks open inside your digestive track and the round worms become embedded in your stomach wall. First you feel stomach pains, and you experience diarrhea and vomiting. If the Trichinella parasite is discovered early, in the intestinal phase, medications like albendazole (Albenza) or mebendazole can be effective in eliminating the intestinal worms and larvae.

Eventually, the larvae enter the blood stream and settle into muscle tissue, where they feed. Once they enter the muscle invasion stage, there’s not a thing you can take for it, other than pain relievers. You’re stuck with these tiny invaders for the rest of your life. And don’t think trichinosis is a disease of the past. A research scientist friend of ours recently told us about observing slides of muscle tissue from a man who has trichinosis. He got it after eating undercooked pork at a family reunion right here in Iowa.

E. Coli Alert

Less than a year ago, U.S. media carried reports of raw spinach contaminated with E. coli and dozens of cases of E. coli-caused food poisoning from undercooked hamburger.

In a Wikipedia article on Escherichia coli (E. coli), I read, “Food poisonings caused by E. coli are usually associated with eating unwashed vegetables and meat contaminated post-slaughter. Meat has to be cooked well enough, or at a high enough temperature to kill the E. coli bacteria. O157:H7, one particularly nasty strain, is further notorious for causing serious and even life-threatening complications like hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Severity of the illness varies considerably; it can be fatal, particularly to young children, the elderly or the immunocompromised.”

With modern methods of meat production, you never know what has happened to the meat before you bought it. An average pound of hamburger may contain meat from more than 500 different cattle. There’s no way of knowing which meat was contaminated or where it came from.

This hamburger could contain meat from some 500 cattle.

This hamburger could contain meat from 500 cattle. Photo: © Carolina K Smith MD - Fotolia.com

How prevalent is poisoning from E. coli? World wide, a strain of E. coli called ETEC causes more than 200 million cases of diarrhea and 380,000 deaths, mostly in children, every year. And that’s just one strain of four.

It’s important to thoroughly wash all raw meat before cooking it. And, as any experienced cook will tell you, it’s also necessary to wash all surfaces that came into contact with the raw meat. That’s because E.coli can be transmitted to other foods that touch a cutting board the meat sat on or a knife used to cut the meat. Finally, make sure to cook the meat hot enough and thoroughly enough to kill any E-coli bacteria on it.

These guidelines printed in the New York Times in 1996 are still used by the Department of Agriculture today:

  • Wash hands, utensils and work surfaces that touch raw meat and poultry before and after handling the food, using hot soapy water.
  • Do not allow raw meat or chicken to sit at room temperature for more than 30 minutes; refrigerate.
  • To prevent problems, cook food thoroughly.
  • Cook both beef and pork to an internal temperature of at least 160 degrees, so that it is slightly pink. The fleshy parts of poultry should reach 180 degrees.

Weighing the Options

So what’s the right thing to do? Do you want to cook those chops or that steak till it’s well done, or eat it rare? Do you want to get cancer of the pancreas, colon, stomach or prostate? Or do you prefer to take your chances with the possibility of tiny worms burrowing into your muscle tissue, or getting sick from E-coli and possibly dying? For some people, this is a hard decision. But not for me.

That veggie burger’s looking better all the time. And pass the potato salad.

Joe Hennager

Blue Planet Green Living (Home Page)

Peanut Recall — Your Food Safety Is Up to You

We learned in the news yesterday of yet another peanut-products recall. This time, the processing plant involved is in Plainview, Texas. It’s owned by Peanut Corporation of America (PCA), the same folks who brought us tainted peanuts in their Blakely, Georgia plant. That recall was in January of this year. Perhaps you remember it? A brief peanut scare swept the nation, with many of us under the misapprehension that peanut butter itself was all we had to worry about.

Are there any contaminated peanut products in this cupboard? The only way to know is to check the list.

Are there any contaminated peanut products in this cupboard? The only way to know is to check the list. Photo: J Wasson

Well, think again, America. The FDA has published a long list for us to check. And check we should, as no major peanut butter brands are even on it. The dangerous “peanut” foods turn out to be ice cream, ice cream cones, candy, cereal, pet foods, cookies… all sorts of non-peanuty items that this consumer (and apparently many others) didn’t know about.

Now, if you or your loved one has a peanut allergy, you’re way ahead of the rest of the nation in understanding which foods to watch out for. But the rest of us are not so savvy. CBS News yesterday posted a fascinating poll that shows how poor is our understanding of the problem.

So, do yourself and your loved ones a favor. If you haven’t read the list, take a good, long look. Check your cupboards. Check your freezer. Check your refrigerator. And check your supply of pet food. With more 666 cases of salmonella and 9 deaths attributed to the peanut problem as of today, this problem is truly a serious one.

You may live far from the PCA plants in Texas and Georgia. You may even live in California or Hawaii or Maine. Wherever you are, you are likely to be affected, as so far, there have been cases of peanut-based salmonella in 45 states.

Cases Infected with the Outbreak Strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, United States, by State, as of February 22, 2009 at 9pm ET (n=666) Source: FDA.gov

Cases Infected with the Outbreak Strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, United States, by State, as of February 22, 2009 at 9pm ET (n=666) Source: FDA.gov

Don’t count on the press to inform you of all the latest news on the topic. We happened to find out about the second recall in a post on DallasNews.com. There was nary another story to be found through our Google search yesterday. Several posts are up today.

By the time we read the article, our neighborhood store had already pulled the offending products. “But,” we asked, “what about the items that had already been purchased?” Our local store department manager told us consumers could “bring them in for a full refund.” Small comfort if the consumers don’t even know they have tainted products.

Buyer beware; you’re practically on your own. This isn’t just a sensational story we can take lightly. It’s the real deal. So check the FDA list below. Better yet, bookmark the FDA Peanut Butter and other Peanut Containing Products Recall List. Check it often. Your family’s food safety is up to you.

And to our Canadian neighbors, please accept an apology from your southern friends. The peanut recall has affected you, too. You may have thought you could trust food products from the USA. We thought we could, but we were wrong. Please check your own Canadian Food Inspection Agency‘s Complete List of Products recalled due to the PCA salmonella contamination. It’s a long one, too.

Julia Wasson

Blue Planet Green Living (Home Page)

The FDA’s “Peanut Butter and other Peanut Containing Products Recall List” current as of 12 p.m. February 25, 2009:

Topics on this Page:
Brownie Product Recalls
Cake and Pie Product Recalls
Candy Product Recalls
Cereal Product Recalls
Cookie Product Recalls
Cracker Product Recalls
Donut Product Recalls
Dressing and Seasoning Product Recalls
Fruit and Vegetable Product Recalls
Ice Cream Product Recalls
Peanut Product Recalls
Peanut Butter Product Recalls
Peanut Paste Product Recalls
Peanut Product Recalls
Pet Food Product Recalls
Pre-Packaged Meals Product Recalls
Snack Bar Product Recalls
Snack and Snack Mix Product Recalls
Topping Product Recalls
Download All Recalled Peanut Containing Products

Brownie Product Recalls
Allann Bros Coffee
Annie B’s (Wholesale Dessert Products)
Avanza Supermarket
Boston Cookies
Econofoods (excluding Wisconsin stores in Sturgeon Bay, Clintonville, Marquette, Holton and Iron Mountain)
Family Fresh Market
Family Thrift Center
Food Bonanza
Pick’n Save (Ohio stores in Van Wert and Ironton only)
Prairie Market
SunMart Foods
Sweet Life
TF Processors
The Father’s Table
Tri-O-Plex
Wholesale Food Outlet

Cake and Pie Product Recalls
Allann Bros Coffee
Annie B’s (QVC Products)
Annie B’s (Wholesale Dessert Products)
Avanza Supermarket
Baker’s
Bindi North America
Casino Chef
Charlie’s
Chef Pierre
City Market
Cuisine Innovations
Dillons
Econofoods (excluding Wisconsin stores in Sturgeon Bay, Clintonville, Marquette, Holton and Iron Mountain)
Family Fresh Market
Family Thrift Center
Follow Your Heart
Food 4 Less
Food Bonanza
Foods Co.
Fred Meyer
Fry’s
Gerbes
Hilander
Jay C
Junior’s
King Soopers
Kmart Bakery
Kroger
Owen’s
Pay Less
Pick’n Save (Ohio stores in Van Wert and Ironton only)
Prairie Market
Presentations
QFC
Ralphs
Rich Products Corporation
Scott’s
Smith’s
SunMart Foods
Sweet Life
Wegmans
Wholesale Food Outlet

Candy Product Recalls
4-H Fundraising
Allann Bros Coffee
American Almond
Bartons Confectioners
Bear Poop
Bear Scat
Best Choice (AWG)
Blains Farm & Fleet
Blanton’s
Botticelli
Buffalo Chips
Camp Masters
Candy Place
Casey’s
Casey’s General Store
Cherry Hill Supremes
Cherrydale Farms
Chicken Coop Poop
Chopanpea
Choxie
Coblentz Chocolate Company
Country Life Natural Foods
Cow Patties
Cow Pies
Crew Rations
Dazzling Delicacies
Deer Droppings
Diabeteze
Diabetone gluco
Dillon’s
Dino Eggs
Dutch Valley
EARTH FARE
Eagle Premium
Eagle Premium (Amcon)
Eillien’s Candies Inc.
Every Day’s A Party
Fannie May
Felix & Oscar
Fish Eggs
Food Club
Fortune Fundraising
Fresh Pick’s Meat & Produce
GFS
GKI
Gayle’s Chocolates
Germack
Giambri
Gold Emblem
Goo Goo
Gurley’s
Haddington Farms
Hallmark
Harry and David
Harvest Fresh Market
Hawk’s Lair Inc.
Heart and Soul Candies
Heavenly Candy’s
Here’s Howe
Hy-Vee
HyVee
JL Manufacturing
Johnny Pomodoro’s
Karma
Kerry Ingredients & Flavours
Kings
Koeze Company
Koppers
Koppers Chocolate
L & L Food Centers
Landies
Landmark
Lizard Eggs
Madelaine
Marich
Marketplace
Maxfield
Meijer
Mills Fleet Farm
Monster Eggs
Moose Droppings
Mr. Chocolate
NATURALLY PREFERRED
Nassau Candy
Nut Bar Candy Shoppe
Oakridge Family Food Centers
Old Fashion Candy Company
Olsen’s Piggly Wiggly
Omaha Steaks
Osprey Poop
Palmer Candy
Palmer Peg
Palmer Selects
Pear’s Gourmet
Pecan Deluxe Candy Company
Penhurst Candy Co.
Plum Markets
Prairie Dog Pebbles
Premier Packing Company
Primrose
Private Labeled or Family Choice
Rain Creek Baking Company
Rain Creek Baking Corporation
Rite Aid
Rodhe’s IGA Marketplace
S & S Candies
SPARTAN
SRF
SUNRIDGE
Sconza Candy
Sentry Food
Shurfine
Shurfine – Western Family
Shurfresh
Silver Lake
Simply Enjoy
Sinbad
SinbadSweets.com
Something Better Natural Foods
South Bend Chocolate Company
Spartan
Star Kay White Inc.
Stuckey’s
Sunbird Snacks
Superior
Taufelen Candy Co.
The Candy Lady
The Foreign Candy Co.
The Kidz Kompany
Theo
Torn Ranch
Tree of Life
Valu Time
Walgreens
Wegmans Swiss Recipe
Wilson Candies
WinCo Foods bins
Zachary

Cereal Product Recalls
Bear Naked
Naughty but Nice

Cookie Product Recalls
ABC
AFC
Allann Bros Coffee
Annabella
Apple Mountain
Archer Farms
Arico
Arizona Gold
Auntie Ono (Hawaii)
Avanza Supermarket
Baker Jo’s
Baker Jo’s Peanut Butter
Baker’s
BakerSource
Bear’s
Best Brands Corp.
Best Maid
Block & Barrel
Blue Ribbon
Boston Cookies
CAMDEN CREEK
Camden Creek
Christie Cookie
City Market
Classic Breaks
Cookie Machine
Cougar Mountain
Cub Foods
Devonshire
Dillons
Dough-to-Go
Dough-to-Go (California)
Econofoods (Excluding Wisconsin stores in Sturgeon Bay, Clintonville, Marquette, Holton and Iron Mountain)
Erin Baker’s
Evening Rise
Family Fresh Market
Family Thrift Center
Famous Amos
Food 4 Less
Food Bonanza
Food Lion Bake Shop
Foods Co.
Fred Meyer
Fry’s
Gerbes
Gigi’s
Gourmet Cookie Dough
Gourmet Cookie Dough JT Ent
Grandessa
Hilander
Hy-Vee
Innisbrook
Jana’s
Jane Dough’s (Washington, Nevada and Arizona)
Jay C
Jimmy’s Cookies
Keebler
King Soopers
Kroger
Lisa’s Favorites
Little Lambs
Lofthouse
Mrs. GoodCookie
One Smart Cookie
Ovens of Ashley
Owen’s
Parco Foods Chuck’s Chunky
Parker
Pastries Plus
Pay Less
Pick’n Save (Ohio stores in Van Wert and Ironton only)
Prairie Market
QFC
QSP
READI-BAKE
Ralphs
Red Apple
Red Wheel Fundraising
Sam’s Choice
School Kine Cookies
Scott’s
Smith’s
SunMart Foods
Sweet Life
Trader Joe’s
Tri-O-Plex
Uncle Eddies Vegan
WalMart Bakery
Wegmans
Wholesale Food Outlet
ZAP

Cracker Product Recalls
Austin Quality Foods
Cambridge
Keebler
Little Debbie
Meijer
ShopRite
Weis Quality

Donut Product Recalls
Kmart Bakery
Mighty-O
Wegmans

Dressing and Seasoning Product Recalls
Kariba Farms
WOW

Fruit and Vegetable Product Recalls

Eating Right
H-E-Buddy
Ready Pac Cool Cuts
Trader Joe’s

Ice Cream Product Recalls

#216 Schwan’s
Aldi Sundae Shoppe
America’s Choice
Artic Classic
Artic Star
Baldwin
Belfonte
Best Choice
Big Y
Bindi North America
Bliss Brothers Dairy
Blue Bunny
Blue Bunny Personals
Bon
Braum’s
Breyers Tin Roof Sundae
Breyers Tin Roof Sundae ice cream
Brigham
Broughton
Buck’s
Byrne Dairy
Carnival
Central Dairy
Component
Country
Country Classic
Country Delight
Creamy Creations
Cub
Cub Foods
Cumberland Farms
DeConna
DeLuxe
Deluxe
Dolly Madison
Econo
Family Pak
Fastco
Flav-O-Rich
Flav-o-rite
Flavorite
Food City
Food Club
Frederick Farms
Galliker
Garber’s
Giant
Giant Eagle
Grande
Great Value
Greens
Hagan
Hannaford Denali
Hershey’s
High’s
Hiland
Hill Country Fare
Hood
Hudsonville Creamery and Ice Cream Co.
Hy-Top
Hy-Vee
IGA
Ice Cream
Ice Girl
JJ Lawson
Jewel
Kay’s
Kemps
Key Food
Krasdale
Lowes
Luvel
Market Basket
Market Pantry
Meadow Gold Herd
Megaroons
Meijer
Meijer’s
Nestle
North Star
Old Fashioned
Old Recipe
Our Family
Pathmark
Perry’s
Pierre’s
Piggly Wiggly
Price Chopper
Pricerite
Private Selection
Publix
Purity
Redners
Rich Products Corporation
Rich’s
Richfood
River Valley
Roundy’s
Ruggles
Shamrock Farms
Shop ‘n Save
Shoprite
Shurfine
Shurfresh
Southern Belle
Southern Home
Stater Bros
Stewart’s Shops
Stop & Shop
Sundae Shoppe
Super A Nut
Supreme Indulgence
Sysco
Tops
Trauth
Turkey Hill Dairy
Turner
Uncle Buck’s
United Dairy
Valu Time
Velvet
Velvet Olde Mill
Wegmans
Weis
Weis Quality
Western Family
White Rose
Winn Dixie
Wonder Ice Cream

Peanut Product Recalls
“Nut Hut” Kiosks
AMSTERDAM GOURMET
Abercrombie USA Grown
Allnuts
Always Save
American Almond
Ass Kickin’
Aurora Natural
Austinuts
Bad Byron’s
Baldwin County
Banana Moon
Best Choice
Blains
Blains Farm & Fleet
C&K Market, Inc.
Casey’s
Casey’s General Store
Centrella
Cumby’s Snacks
DUREY LIBBY
Dingman’s Dairy
EARTH FARE
Eagle Premium
Econo Pac
Eillien’s
Fazenda
First Choice
Gel Spice Co.
Georgia Peanuts
GloryBee Foods, Inc.
Grand Rapids Popcorn
HERSHEY IMPORT COMPANY
Herman’s Nut House
Hialeah Products, New Urban Farms, Epicure Market, Stiles Market, Gardners Market, Baileys General Store, Hales Grove River Market, The Sandy Butler, Carmines Market, Joannas Marketplace, Crown Wine & Spirits, Florida Snacks, Rosen Plaza Hotel, Rosen Shingle Creek, Grapevine Gourmet, Perricones Marketplace, Kastners, Salamander Market, Oh Nuts,  Mazzaro Market, Portofino Market, Portofino Winebank, Artdeco Market, Diamond Café & Market, Surfmed, Sunharvest Snacks, Healthy State of Mind, Fisher Island, Golden Cockatoo, Kosher Marketplace
In-Room Plus
Key Foods Private Label
Kitty Clover
Laxmi
Lunds and Byerly’s
Market Pantry
Markets of Meijer
Marlow
Meijer
Mills Fleet Farm
Nassau Candy
Nature’s Promise
PIC-A-NUT
Parnell’s Pride
Peanut Corporation of America
Peanut Corporation of America or Parnell’s Pride
Premier Packing Company
Primrose
Ramapo Ridge Private Label
Reggie’s
Robinson Crusoe
Root Farms
SNACK SHACK
SUNRIDGE
Safeway’s “Nut Hut” Kiosk
Skinner’s
Snack Naturally
SunRidge Farms
Sunbird Snacks
Sunset Orchard
Supreme Choice
The Alps
Thrifty Nut
Tropical Nut and Fruit
Tropical Nuts
Valued Naturals
WEST BANK GOURMET
WOODSTOCK FARMS
Werner
Whole Foods Market

Peanut Butter Product Recalls

“Nut Hut” Kiosks
Allann Bros Coffee
American Almond
Bear Naked
Fresh Direct
GRANDE GOURMET
King Nut
LUCKY
New Seasons
POCO PAC
Parnell’s Pride
Peanut Corporation of America or Parnell’s Pride
SUNRIDGE
Unbranded for further distribution
Vitamin Cottage
Whole Foods

Peanut Paste Product Recalls
Peanut Corporation of America or Parnell’s Pride

Peanut Product Product Recalls
Peanut Corporation of America or Parnell’s Pride

Pet Food Product Recalls
Aggieville USA, Mountain Grove, MO
American Health Kennels, Inc.
American Nutrition, Inc.
Carolina Prime
Carolina Prime Pet
Farm Style
Grreat Choice
Happy Tails
Healthy Hide
Healthy-hide Deli-wrap
Hill Country Fare
Integrity
Mill Creek
Morning Melodies
Morning Song
Next Gen Pet Products
Northwest Royal
Premium
Royal Wing
Salix
Shoppers Valu
Springfield Prize
Vita Bone Flavors
Vita Snacks
Western Family Biscuits
Western Trade Group, Inc.
Yeaster

Pre-Packaged Meals Product Recalls
Allann Bros Coffee
Dinners Ready
Ethnic Gourmet
Follow Your Heart
Fresh Direct
Gluten Free Café
Meal BREAKS
Red Cloud Food Service
Sure-Pak
The Traditions
Trader Joe’s
Trader Ming’s

Snack Bar Product Recalls
Advantage
All Natural Mega Protein
Allann Bros Coffee
Arbonne
Archer Farms
Arico
Attain
Avanza Supermarket
Balance
Bartons Confectioners
CAN DO KID
CLIF BAR
Can Do Kid
Cascadian Farm
Cherrydale Farms
Complete Life
Day Break
Detour
Detour Biker
Detour Core Strength
Detour Runner
Dr. Melina
EB Performance
Econofoods (Excluding Wisconsin stores in Sturgeon Bay, Clintonville, Marquette, Holton and Iron Mountain)
Endulge
Evening Rise
Family Fresh Market
Family Thrift Center
Food Bonanza
GNC Triflex
Genisoy
Health Valley
Isagenix
Isagenix IsaLean
JamFrakas
Jenny’s Cuisine
Karma
Kashi TLC
LUNA
LÄRABAR
MLO BIO PROTEIN BARS
MLO XTREME PROTEIN BARS
MOJO
Market Pantry
NUTRILITE
Naturally Preferred
Nature’s Plus
Naughty but Nice
Nestle
NutriPals
NutriSystem
Odwalla
Oh Soo Good
OhYeah!
Optimum Energy Bars
Perfect Weight America
Pick’n Save (Ohio stores in Van Wert and Ironton only)
Prairie Market
ProFlex15
ProFlex20
Promax
Promax 70
Promedis
Rockin’ Roll
SOY PROTEIN BARS
Shaklee
Slim-Fast MEAL OPTIONS
Slim-Fast optima
Special K Protein
SunMart Foods
SunRidge
Supreme Protein
TITAN
TWISTED
Think Thin
Trader Joe’s
Tri-O-Plex
Triple Delicious
WHA GURU CHEW
Wholesale Food Outlet
XS
Zone
ZonePerfect
fücoPROTEIN

Snack and Snack Mix Product Recalls
A Southern Season Private Label
ACME
ALDI
Acme
Albertsons
Aunt Patty’s
Aurora Natural
Austinuts
Avanza Supermarket
BRIDGEHAMPTON GORP
Banana Moon
Bartons Confectioners
Bear Naked
Berry Blossom
Betty Lou’s
Blains Farm & Fleet
Bloom
Break-A-Way Canada Private Label (Includes Gourmet Line)
Break-A-Way U.S. Private Label
Bunny Food
C&K Market, Inc.
Café W
Caribou
Casey’s
Casey’s General Store
Champion
Chef Inspired
Cherrydale Farms
Cumby’s Snacks
Cupids Crunch
Dancing Star
Dutch Valley
EARTH FARE
EXPRESS SNACKS
Eagle Premium (Amcon)
Econofoods (Excluding Wisconsin stores in Sturgeon Bay, Clintonville, Marquette, Holton and Iron Mountain)
Eillien’s
FOOD LION
FULL CIRCLE
Family Fresh Market
Family Thrift Center
First Choice
Food Bonanza
Fred Meyer
Freedom Trail Mixes of Boston Private Label
Full Circle
GRATEFUL HARVEST
Gramma Anna’s
Grandpa’s Oven
Great Skott Foods
Greenwise
HEB
HERSHEY IMPORT COMPANY
Happy Healthy Private Label
Hialeah Products, New Urban Farms, Epicure Market, Stiles Market, Gardners Market, Baileys General Store, Hales Grove River Market, The Sandy Butler, Carmines Market, Joannas Marketplace, Crown Wine & Spirits, Florida Snacks, Rosen Plaza Hotel, Rosen Shingle Creek, Grapevine Gourmet, Perricones Marketplace, Kastners, Salamander Market, Oh Nuts,  Mazzaro Market, Portofino Market, Portofino Winebank, Artdeco Market, Diamond Café & Market, Surfmed, Sunharvest Snacks, Healthy State of Mind, Fisher Island, Golden Cockatoo, Kosher Marketplace
Hy-Vee
In-Room Plus
International
J.J. Kelly
Jewel
KA-ME
Key Foods Private Label
Kings
Koppers Chocolate
Lesserevil
Lunds and Byerly’s
Magical Munchies Private Label
Marin
Market Basket Private Label
Martha Stewart
Mills Fleet Farm
Mountain Man
NATURALLY PREFERRED
NATURE’S PROMISE
Nassau Candy
Nature’s Original
Natures World
Naughty but Nice
Ocean Spray
Olympia Delight
Orchard Crest Farms
Our Kitchen
PIC-A-NUT
Parnell’s Pride
Pick’n Save (Ohio stores in Van Wert and Ironton only)
Prairie Market
Premier Packing Company
Premium Orchard
Publix
Rachels Private Label
Ramapo Ridge Private Label
Reindeer Food
RiverTrail
Root Farms
Royal Snacks
SUN HARVEST
SUNRIDGE
Shaw’s
Shurfine Brand
Simbree
Simply Enjoy
Snack Naturally
Something Better Natural Foods
Stone Mountain Line
SunMart Foods
SunRidge Farms
Sunbird Snacks
Sunbird Snacks Gourmet Line
Sunridge Farms
Sunset Orchard
Superior
Supreme Choice
Sweet Life
The Long Trail Brewing Company
The Mark
Torn Ranch
Trail’s End
Tree of Life
Valued Naturals
WOODFIELD FARMS
WOODSTOCK FARMS
Werner
White Birtch Private Label
Whole Foods
Wholesale Food Outlet
Wild West Private Label
WinCo Foods
Zachary

Topping Product Recalls
Barefoot Contessa
Best Choice
Eillien’s Candies
Fred Meyer
Kroger
PIC-A-NUT
Ralphs
Simply Enjoy
Stonewall Kitchen